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Thousand Yard Stare (2018)

Thousand Yard Stare (2018)
Thousand Yard Stare posterRating: 4.8/10 (28 votes)
Director: Aaron Kurmey
Writer: Ryan Hatt, Kevin Johnson, Aaron Kurmey, Adam Munro
Stars: Adam Munro, Kirsten Wendlandt, Gin Fedotov, Michael Dodge
Runtime: 91 min
Rated: N/A
Genre: War
Released: 07 May 2018
Plot: Returning home after fighting in Africa during World War II, a soldier with PTSD finds reintegrating with family life increasingly difficult as he relives the battle of Kasserine Pass.

Thousand Yard Stare (2018)

Thousand Yard Stare (2018) talks about during World War II, German forces crush the Americans at the ‘Battle of Kasserine Pass’. A lone Sergeant, Roland Rothach, is separated from his platoon in the North Africa deserts. Captured by German soldiers, he’s forced to face his worst fears. Fears that haunt him long after the war ends. Back home he struggles with flashbacks of the horrors and trauma he experienced, a failing marriage, and the emptiness of isolation.

The phrase was popularized after Life magazine published the painting Marines Call It That 2,000 Yard Stare by World War II artist and correspondent Tom Lea,[1] although the painting was not referred to with that title in the 1945 magazine article. The painting, a 1944 portrait of a nameless Marine at the Battle of Peleliu, is now held by the United States Army Center of Military History in Fort Lesley J. McNair, Washington, D.C.[2] About the real-life Marine who was his subject, Lea said:

He left the States 31 months ago. He was wounded in his first campaign. He has had tropical diseases. He half-sleeps at night and gouges Japs out of holes all day. Two-thirds of his company has been killed or wounded. He will return to attack this morning. How much can a human being endure?[3]

When recounting his arrival in Vietnam in 1965, then-Corporal Joe Houle (director of the Marine Corps Museum of the Carolinas in 2002) said he saw no emotion in the eyes of his new squad: “The look in their eyes was like the life was sucked out of them,” later learning that the term for their condition was the 1,000-yard stare. “After I lost my first friend, I felt it was best to be detached,” he explained.[4]

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